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Antique Serving Cart

Follow along to see how this antique cart was given a fun farmhouse finish.

I purchased this sweet antique wheeled cart and as soon as I brought it home my youngest daughter asked for it for Christmas as a plant stand in her new apartment. When asked what colors she saw it in, she instantly said white and dark stain.

As with all my pieces, especially the old antiques that have seen years of wear and use I scrub them thoroughly. You can in the still photo and the video just how much grime and dirt comes off.


Next I removed the bottom shelf for easier stripping and staining. Both flat surfaces were stripped with paint stripper then power sanded smooth. The corners on the top surface with the raised edges required hand sanding to get into the tight corners.


Once the sanding was complete and the whole piece wiped down again to remove any sanding dust it was time to stain. I chose my go to Homestead House's stain and finishing oil all in one  in the color cappuccino. See a farmhouse h…

Cerused Coffee Table


Occasionally I rethink a project I have done and redo it in a new finish. This cute low coffee table that was painted grey with a sweet stencil had sat too long.


Seeing it was solid wood I thought it would be the perfect project to ceruse. What is cerusing wood you say?

"Back in the 1500's, the French invented a technique of filling in the grains in oak beams and paneling with a toxic paste derived from lead. This was initially done to help prevent rot in oak beams. ... Today that stylish finish is still called limed oak in Europe and here in the US we call it cerused wood or cerused oak." GoHaus.com

Start by sanding the finish off down to bare wood. I used my orbital sander and 40 grit since a few layers of paint




Next take a wire brush (yes this is a drill attachment I bought after watching a YouTube Video claiming it worked but it is far to harsh as per test board so I used manual like a brush) and going with the grain in long smooth strokes to open the pores and raise the grain. This took a bit of time to get to the desired look.


Once finished I brushed the top well to remove any bits of wood left before I applied a coat of Homestead House's new stain and finishing oil all in one in driftwood then left to dry overnight.



To achieve the ceruse color I applied Fusion Mineral Paint's newly released liming wax.



See the difference of liming wax on the right and driftwood stain alone on the left




One coat fully applied and wiped back



I added a final coat of liming wax and this is the final result










*Disclosure
I have received product as a brand blog rep in exchange for this post, but ALL the opinions are entirely MY own.  This post contains sponsored links for Fusion Mineral Paint & Homestead House Paint Co. to help you find the items I used easily. There is no monetary compensation to me, strictly added for your convenience ;)




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