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Vintage Coffee Table Goes Beachy Milk Painted

Solid wood vintage coffee table, yes please!! Especially once updated in fresh beachy colors.

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Step one: SCRUB WELL and let dry!
This solid wood beauty was given to me by a neighbor who was downsizing her stash, thanks Cara. I knew it had loads of possibility as I have done a few similar vintage coffee tables like it. A recent one in farmhouse whites and this one below many moons ago.

Step two: sand all the old finish off the top.

The top was sanded to bare wood using my handy dandy Dewalt orbital sander .

It was then hand sanded on the edges to remove the old finish along there as well.

My initial plan was to give the bare wood a white wash look. I chose Weatherwood Stains white maintenance oilapplied with a blue shop towel and wiped back after it soaked in for about 10 minutes. The top part has the oil applied, it hydrates the wood too. Two coats were…

Rae Dunn Inspired Bread Box



If you haven't heard of Rae Dunn you may not be a farmhouse style fan. This uber popular line of kitchen decor is so simple yet so classic. Bright white with crisp black narrow font gives a universal appeal to almost any style kitchen. Follow me as I take a solid wood bread box and give it a "Rae Dunn" inspired makeover.


These solid wood bread boxes can be found everywhere but they are just so boring and generic. The simple smooth styling however is perfect for the inspired makeover I have in mind.


I first taped off the inside edges wanting to leave the interior the natural wood finish.


I am excited to try my new 2" angled Fusion paint brush as well on this project.


Using Fusion Mineral Paint in picket fence, a crisp white, I applied 3 coats. White is notorious for requiring more coats for an opaque coverage. After each coat I lightly sponge sanded to keep a soft smooth surface.


Now for the Rae Dunn inspired part, being a reduce reuse recycle person I cannot personally use the stencil making machines due to all the waste they incur. I also choose rather then print out a printed copy to trace on the "clean" side of a previously printed paper my chosen font.

Skinny font was what I went with for closest to the actual Rae Dunn style. Once I found where I wanted the word BREAD, I used the pencil transfer method (rub the side of a pencil tip on the backside to leave a light coating of charcoal) to lightly trace it onto the piece.


Usually I hand paint with small artist brushes but seeing this font is narrow I opted for my Sharpie oil paint pen in black. Slow and steady is the key and requires going over a few times on each letter.


And here it is ;) What do you  think? Would it work in your kitchen?









Featured on Hometalk December 15, 2018

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